DECADES

From its origins in the 40's through to today, BAFTA has been shaped both by the shifting political and social environment and also by changes in the public’s relationship to film, television and games. Explore BAFTA's evolution below.

1940s

As cinema brings together the nation following the devastation of the war, a new Academy for filmmakers is born.

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1950s

Cinema’s popularity remained steadfast while many more homes acquired a television in order to watch the coronation of the Queen. The British Film Academy merged with the Guild of Television Producers and Directors.

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1960s

The 60s were a time of experimentation and an increasing sophistication in film and television. A new genre – social realism – emerged, which sought to give voice to the voiceless. This particular British tradition endures today.

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1970s

Colour televisions became more commonplace and the ‘small screen’ firmly took hold of the public’s imagination. The Society of Film and Television Arts changed its name to the British Academy of Film and Television Arts – BAFTA.

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1980s

British film production continued to decrease, while on television the cosiness of the previous decade was challenged by the alternative comedy movement and the newly created Channel 4. Gaming consoles began to enter the home.

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1990s

UK film investment began to increase and an explosion of television channels led to more choice and diversity on the small screen. Advances in technology gave rise to several new genres of video games.

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2000s

Digital television led to a massive increase in the number of channels available, while the renaissance of British film continued. Mobile and online gaming took hold. The BAFTA Games Awards were launched.

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2010s

BAFTA’s profile continued to grow and there was a renewed commitment to supporting talented newcomers and help them succeed, regardless of their background.

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